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I have an Idea!!!

dogsbody

Honorary Member
Club Member
Feb 29, 2008
3,772
1,136
Castleford, West Yorks
just to show why we use gauntlets
29eceddd67f424262eed7cda8c8c61d3.jpg

When you are new to welding, those type of burns will make you stop welding and dance about for a bit.
After a while you feel the burn but tough it out and keep welding.
After a few years you don't even notice them :)
 
When you are new to welding, those type of burns will make you stop welding and dance about for a bit.
After a while you feel the burn but tough it out and keep welding.
After a few years you don't even notice them :)
well I did the first two.

I don't know I was just thinking from a new persons point of view on wearing all that stuff. doing this for awhile now. I don't always stop everything and put on my welding jacket and my gloves and that hat that you wear under your helmet to keep sparks off of your head while Im at work. Although I've been on fire more times then I can count. I don't even always wear a helmet in all honesty.
At home if I'm welding alot I wear all that stuff, even if I do look like I could contain a biohazard situation in it.

HOWEVER. for learning purposes and safety concerns anything I post in the welding section will have the protective gear being used. Unless I'm proving a point on what can happen.
Speaking of any clue when this is going live?
 

Herak

Well-known user
Apr 23, 2014
350
164
Bradistan
I just found as a learner that it was MUCH easier to weld without melting the thumb of the gauntlets until it was a shrink fit, boiling my thumb. Learned much quicker after throwing them away, and oddly manage not to roast my hands without gauntlets. Even now, if I put gauntlets on, I'll melt the thumb.
Plus, the gauntlets most will buy starting out will not really fit their hand, and WILL feel like boxing gloves.

Think back - how many thousands of hours have you spent operating a torch, and how many times have you actually required medical care? Anything counts - from pouring cold water on your finger, to being in a coma for 6 years, with 90% of your body having to be replaced.

Oh, don't get me wrong, I love looking at expert welds. I have absolutely nothing against craftsmanship - except when a novice is being shown perfect TIG welds, then told to wear boxing gloves to hold a MIG, not understanding how the wire speed affects current, and WTF 1/2/3 and MIN/MAX switches are really doing.

A novice joiner being shown only perfect dovetails will NEVER recreate them unless they also learn about measuring, calculating, and even which tools to use for which bit. Certainly never going to manage unless they're taught how to keep an edge on their chisel, or how to feel the wood through the tool. He ain't going to learn either, if he's purely focused on how the joint looks - oh it may look pretty, but it'll be weak AF because the outside was all he saw - inside the joint could be a mass of shavings and air.

For every hand laid stack of dimes, there are probably thousands of hideous welds that are just as strong, if not more so. I just think novices should learn the importance of penetration way before they're set on the goal of leaving an aesthetically pleasing surface to run over with the grinder.