Review: 3/5 'Nighteye' autolighting H7 LED headlamp bulb

nvingo

Club Member
Nov 15, 2015
941
817
King's Lynn
Bought these via 'fulfilled by Amazon':
"NIGHTEYE H7 8000LM LED Headlight Bulbs Conversion Kit, DOT Approved, S1 series Super Bright LED Automotive Headlamp-6500K Xenon White (2 Pack)"
I haven't tested these on the road yet, but I fitted them tonight.
IMG_20181106_182528.jpg
They arrived in the usual Amazon carton, two bulbs in the pack in simple grey polystyrene insert.IMG_20181106_182537.jpg
How the halogen/filament bulb looks lit.
IMG_20181106_184611.jpg
Then the LED
IMG_20181106_184618.jpg
Both together for comparison.
IMG_20181106_184736.jpg
Now for the fitment tale, and the reason why I haven't given 5 stars.

OK so we (should) all know how to change a Cougar headlamp bulb; grill off, headlamp housing(s) undone and pulled forward, housing rear cover undone/removed.
Disconnect the cable from the bulb, swing away the hinged spring retainer and extract the old bulb.

So far so good.

Now to fit the LED.
Place the LED into the headlamp aperture. Now due to the size of the LED heatsink, the hinged spring clip won't go around it.
So remove the spring clip, place it around the LED between the bulb and heatsink, insert the bulb and try to refit the spring clip into its holes. Very fiddly, but eventually done.
Now try to secure the spring clip to retain the bulb/LED.
Due to the halogen bulb having a metal backplate and the LED having a plastic one, that on the LED is thicker, so it is harder to lock the clip into place. Also the stem of the LED (between the backplate and the heatsink) is chubby, stretching the clip so the it only secures partly on the hook.
Then connect the bulb cable to the flylead from the LED (necessary due the heatsink occupying the space where this normally connects) and try the headlights before refitting - as LEDs need the polarity to be correct and you don't want to go any further before correcting this.

As I say, I haven't road tested yet, but light output seems OK, but these definitely aren't a drop-in substitute for a standard bulb. I got worried they wouldn't fit at all (especially the heatsink into the housing) and am still not entirely satisfied with their security.
 
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Foobar

Club Member
Jul 30, 2017
2,609
2,034
Great Yarmouth, NORFOLK
Bought these via 'fulfilled by Amazon':
"NIGHTEYE H7 8000LM LED Headlight Bulbs Conversion Kit, DOT Approved, S1 series Super Bright LED Automotive Headlamp-6500K Xenon White (2 Pack)"
I haven't tested these on the road yet, but I fitted them tonight...

Thanks Norman, this is really timely for me. I had a dipped beam bulb fail and of course that triggered in me a desire to improve my headlights generally. I will probably be posting a few questions shortly, as I have been doing some research on UKC and Google generally and really don't know which way to turn. So LEDs are now also on my list, subject to your 'road test'. Thanks again - Noel
 
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nvingo

Club Member
Nov 15, 2015
941
817
King's Lynn
Yeah I'd had a pair of 'show'LEDs in over the summer (light mornings and evenings) and was changing back to filament bulbs at the weekend. Out of four bulbs formerly in the Cougar(s), only one (in the photos) worked. A new bulb from a spares pack in the motorhome, blew before it lit like one of the three non-op (intact filament before fitting). So rather than replace with filament (I read up on Philips 150% that don't last long) so went for the LEDs.
Edit: just to add, that the 'show' LEDs, that I first used in T241, were a perfect install, just for some reason the light output/beam was inadequate.
 
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Pid_16V

Admin (Uncle Al)
Club Admin
Nov 20, 2006
26,600
8,374
Mansfield (Robin Hood Country)
They do look like a good light, alternative to HID perhaps? Fitting sounds painful though i like the fan and heatsink idea. Good reeview Norman and I will also be watching for the road test review.
 

nvingo

Club Member
Nov 15, 2015
941
817
King's Lynn
Several LEDs on sale, do have a fan and heatsink; I chose these because they don't have a fan, more chance of fitting in the housing and less to fail.
 
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Foobar

Club Member
Jul 30, 2017
2,609
2,034
Great Yarmouth, NORFOLK
Yeah I'd had a pair of 'show'LEDs in over the summer (light mornings and evenings) and was changing back to filament bulbs at the weekend. Out of four bulbs formerly in the Cougar(s), only one (in the photos) worked. A new bulb from a spares pack in the motorhome, blew before it lit like one of the three non-op (intact filament before fitting). So rather than replace with filament (I read up on Philips 150% that don't last long) so went for the LEDs.
Edit: just to add, that the 'show' LEDs, that I first used in T241, were a perfect install, just for some reason the light output/beam was inadequate.

Sorry to split hairs but why 'show' LEDs ? From one of the motor shows perhaps ?

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Several LEDs on sale, do have a fan and heatsink; I chose these because they don't have a fan, more chance of fitting in the housing and lesa to fail.

Thanks again for the info. With the potential for MOT issues with HIDs, it seems that these might be a better bet, subject of course to your road test. If they are sufficiently better than stock and / or equal / better / close to HID performance, it might be worth designing an improved cover / fan arrangment ? Is there any sign of an MOT issue with LEDs ?
 

nvingo

Club Member
Nov 15, 2015
941
817
King's Lynn
'Show' as in, fit to 'show cars', not approved for road, lower power usage useful to sparkle the car without engine running.

I think the only/simplest mod to accomodate the road LEDs would be a sustitute for the spring-clip retainer.

As long as the illumination level and beam pattern match the filament bulbs there doesn't ought to be any MOT issue, mine is up next month so I'll submit it for first test with them, if necessary exchange for filament ones when work for retest is carried out.
 
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Mako

Club Member
Feb 6, 2011
13,502
10,690
Milton Keynes
I really appreciate the review - we need more of these, even for basic stuff - even if the outcome is very disappointing. I like to use LEDs wherever possible (mainly because my night vision is failing) and the only reason I fitted standard incandescents to my four sidelights was because I didn't like the difference in colour temperature between the LED ones and the normal dipped beam. The fitment struggle and potential lack of secureness has definitely put me off, so the hunt continues.

0Q8mbuS.jpg



One other question - do these bulbs cause your bulb-out OHC warning to light up through lack of load?
 

martw80888

Club Member
May 25, 2015
1,477
2,105
Poole, Dorset
Following this with interest because I've been thinking of fitting something like this - not for dipped beam though (I've already got HIDs for that), but for main beam. HIDs have never struck me as particularly suited for mains due to the 1-2 second "warm-up" time they seem to need, but I like the idea of having "instant-on" bright white high-beams....
 

Foobar

Club Member
Jul 30, 2017
2,609
2,034
Great Yarmouth, NORFOLK
Following this with interest because I've been thinking of fitting something like this - not for dipped beam though (I've already got HIDs for that), but for main beam. HIDs have never struck me as particularly suited for mains due to the 1-2 second "warm-up" time they seem to need, but I like the idea of having "instant-on" bright white high-beams....

Thanks for mentioning the 'warm up time'. I didn't spot this elsewhere and as I have never used HIDs I was unaware of it. Definitely a serious consideration....

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'Show' as in, fit to 'show cars', not approved for road, lower power usage useful to sparkle the car without engine running.

I think the only/simplest mod to accomodate the road LEDs would be a sustitute for the spring-clip retainer.

As long as the illumination level and beam pattern match the filament bulbs tbere doesn't ought to be any MOT issue, mine is up next month so I'll submit it for first test with them, if necessary exchange for filament ones when work for retest is carried out.

Sorry, I was being dense. You mean the bulb retainer clip and not the back cover clip, my bad. Show bulbs is another term I have learned to day. Light output of course has to be the same or greater, that makes sense.

However, the beam pattern is I think going to depend upon several factors; 1) position of the hotspot, 2) size / shape of the hotspot, 3) supporting structures for the bulb / filament. I would imagine that in a 'perfect' lightsource / reflector that there is a single infinitely small hotspot at the precise focus of the reflector and no supports required. It would also produce a perfect parallel beam. Everything else being a compromise, but that can be used to good effect if properly designed to give 'areas' of light at required distances, instead of just a narrow parallel beam.

Positioning the hotspot it seems is a matter of design and accuracy of manufacture. I remember making my own halogen bulb out of bits for a motorbike when I was 18 and it was ***** - brighter but little focus because I didn't realise the filament position was critical. However, the size and shape of a hotspot depends on the technology to some extent, as tungsten filaments are say 1mm x 5mm, HIDs use a small capsule which is larger and wider, LEDs need bigger supports / heatsinking and may not radiate in all directions. Any such change in the hotspot will thus affect the beam. Some of the offerings on eBay defy the imagination as to how they are supposed to give any kind of focus at all...

- - - Updated - - -

I really appreciate the review - we need more of these, even for basic stuff - even if the outcome is very disappointing. I like to use LEDs wherever possible (mainly because my night vision is failing) and the only reason I fitted standard incandescents to my four sidelights was because I didn't like the difference in colour temperature between the LED ones and the normal dipped beam. The fitment struggle and potential lack of secureness has definitely put me off, so the hunt continues.

One other question - do these bulbs cause your bulb-out OHC warning to light up through lack of load?

At one time I thought the same about my night vision. Fortunately, during a routine sight test, my optician enquired about this ( perhaps knowing that this eventually happens to most of us ) and although I did not need or wear 'distance' glasses during the day, these were recommended for driving. Assuming ( and not being nosy here ) that you do not have any identified defect, you might be as surprised as I was when wearing glasses only at night for driving - I was 'like a bird released'. I believe its because the iris opens much wider and effectively reduces the 'depth of field' as on a camera. In daylight that just doesn't happen. Apologies if you are already aware of this but better that, than take the chance you do not...
 

nvingo

Club Member
Nov 15, 2015
941
817
King's Lynn
One other question - do these bulbs cause your bulb-out OHC warning to light up through lack of load?
No bulb-out warning! (Does the C2 5-lamp console have that?)
However, the beam pattern is I think going to depend upon several factors; 1) position of the hotspot, 2) size / shape of the hotspot, 3) supporting structures for the bulb / filament. I would imagine that in a 'perfect' lightsource / reflector that there is a single infinitely small hotspot at the precise focus of the reflector and no supports required. It would also produce a perfect parallel beam. Everything else being a compromise, but that can be used to good effect if properly designed to give 'areas' of light at required distances, instead of just a narrow parallel beam.

Positioning the hotspot it seems is a matter of design and accuracy of manufacture.
Supplier photos; I think the elements are pretty much where the filament would be and this influenced my choice.

H7LED_DIMENSIONS.jpgH7LED_BEAM.jpg
Note the filament bulb has an opaque cap:
H7_INC.jpg[SUB][SUP]
[/SUP][/SUB]

I should have taken photos during bulb fitting to fully explain the issues of fit and secureness, as I said it's all down to the collar and particularly the tube to the heatsink which is non-existent on the filament bulbs.

As to forward illumination, white light floods a decent-enough patch of road and up to tailgate lip level of the car in front, quite adequate for purpose (sorry it isn't more scientific).

What i did notice passing a car parked half-on the road, was that the beam didn't strike its reflectors, not a problem as I was in a 30 limit.

So if the fitting issue could be overcome (alternate retainer) they'd warrant a score of 4+
 
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